MODULE 3: Books as Information Sources:
Section 6 of 6, DOCUMENTATION, page 1 of 1.

DOCUMENTATION

Documentation means telling the reader where you got that information.

If you are paraphrasing, summarizing, or quoting, or if you are using a graph, chart, or just one piece of data, you need to document all of your sources.

Consider that a book may have any number of authors, editors, or translators. It may have a corporate author or no stated author at all. It may be comprised of multiple volumes or be part of a series. It may be an edition or a reprint of an earlier book.

Documentation is a complex process—one which takes good recordkeeping, time, and the proper tools, i.e., style manual(s), to do well.

The following examples are not provided to show you how to do documentation (see Modules 2 and 8 for more information in that regard).

The examples which follow are intended to:

Tip: The examples below are for books retrieved from databases. Documenting these types of resources always involves the name of the database from which the source was accessed and may require the date of retrieval as well.

EXAMPLE 1.

Sample text from a college paper:

The levels of elements such as boron and sodium have risen steadily since the formation of the Salton Sea (Patten, McCaskie, & Unitt, 2003, 8-9). Concern for the adverse effects…

In the text above, the part in parenthesis is the citation. It indicates to the reader from what source the writer obtained the information. The citation, above, and the corresponding reference, below, are shown in American Psychological Association (APA) style.

Sample reference:

Patten, M., McCaskie, G., & Unitt, P.

     (2003). Birds of the Salton Sea: Status,

     biogeography, and ecology. Berkeley, CA:

     University of California Press. Retrieved

     from NetLibrary database.

 

   EXAMPLE 2.

Sample text from a college paper:

The levels of elements such as boron and sodium have risen steadily since the formation of the Salton Sea (Patten, McCaskie, and Unitt 8-9). Concern for the adverse effects…

In the text above, the part in parenthesis is the citation. It indicates to the reader from what source the writer obtained the information. The citation, above, and the corresponding reference, below, are shown in Modern Language Association (MLA) style.

Sample reference:

Patten, Michael, Guy McCaskie, and Philip Unitt.

     Birds of the Salton Sea: Status,Biogeography,

     and Ecology. Berkeley, CA: University of California

     Press, 2003. NetLibrary. 11 Nov. 2008.

 

END OF SECTION: DOCUMENTATION


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