Frequently Asked Questions

Curriculum and Instructional Design

What is curriculum and instructional design?

  • Persons completing the Curriculum and Instructional Design concentration are equipped to use well-accepted, systematic curriculum and course design processes for adult learners.
  • The systematic process studied in this concentration is Instructional Systems Design (ISD) with emphasis on the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation (ADDIE) process.
  • In addition, to design curricula for adult learners, instructional designers must possess sufficient understanding of the nature of adult learning, its social context, and historical roots.

What do instructional designers do?

  • They design (create) curricula to meet clients’ needs. These clients include industrial, governmental, and/or private entities with needs to train or educate adults.
  • They analyze clients’ needs, design and develop instructional solutions, assist in the implementation of instruction, and evaluate the effectiveness of curricula design.
  • They assist educators in multiple venues in improving and implementing their instruction.

How are instructional designers prepared?

  • They undertake an 11 course program (33 hours), containing both core and concentration area courses.
  • The core courses consist of research, issues and trends in adult learning, adult learning theory, and the psychological foundations of adult learning.
  • The concentration area courses are comprised of instructional design, curriculum considerations for adults, educational evaluation, and methods and strategies for teaching adults.

Who hires instructional designers?

  • There is an ongoing and robust need for instructional designers in governmental and military organizations, industry and private companies. Adult education is a vital part of any company, business, or governmental enterprise; as such, instructional designers are sought and well paid.
  • At the K-12 level, instructional designers are called “instructional coordinators.” Although the curriculum and instructional design curriculum focuses on adult learners, much of the material is closely related the work of instructional coordinators.

Instructional Technology

What is instructional technology (IT)?

  • IT is the systematic use of technology, both as product and process, to improve instruction.
  • Technology is employed as product when it is used in the form of hardware (mainly digital) and software to assist in the instructional process.
  • Technology is leveraged as process when it applied in the form of systems theory to discipline the instructional design process.

What do instructional technologists do?

  • They design (create) instruction that is more relevant in our digital environment.
  • They improve instruction by adding digital elements such as multimedia and the Internet.
  • They teach teachers about instruction that uses technology.
  • They add technology products to class room environments.

How are instructional technologists prepared?

  • They undertake an 11 course program (33 hours), containing both core and concentration area courses.
  • The core courses consist of research, issues and trends, learning theory, and the social context of adult education.
  • The concentration area courses are comprised of instructional design, the Internet, distance learning, instructional technology across the K-12 and post-secondary curriculum, and visual communication.

Who hires instructional technologists?

  • Schools, as both classroom teachers and as those who install and maintain technology
  • Libraries, as media specialists
  • Industry, as trainers, designers of instruction, and communication experts
  • Distance learning departments at colleges/universities

Leadership Studies

What is leadership studies?

  • The leadership studies concentration prepares individuals to assume leadership positions in a wide variety of organizations including governmental, non-profit, and for-profit enterprises.
  • Our students come from a variety of organizations. They usually have significant work experience and they are ready to pursue positions within management.

How are leadership practitioners prepared?

  • They undertake an 11 course program (33 hours), containing both core and concentration area courses.
  • The core courses consist of research, issues and trends, learning theory, and the social context of adult education.
  • The concentration area courses are practitioner oriented with real life experiences utilized as case studies in leadership. Specific courses address finance; human relations, data analysis, and leadership are offered within the program.

Who hires individuals with a degree in leadership studies?

  • Our students are consistently promoted to leadership positions within their current organizations, or they have assumed leadership positions within other organizations.
  • Higher education
  • Public and private sector institutions with an emphasis in educational program management and delivery
  • Industry trainers, designers of instruction, and communication experts